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Posted on: 10/29/07:

Jesus is His Name

Category: General
Posted by: gfelix3
Jesus Etch A Sketch

“And there is salvation in no one else; for there is no other name under heaven that has been given among men by which we must be saved.” –Acts 4:12

It doesn’t take very long to realize the impact that the name of Jesus Christ has on American culture. “Jesus” and “Christ” have earned their spot in the regular rotation of this nation’s foul language. Nobody blasphemes the name of Krishna nor does anyone shout “Joseph Smith!” out of frustration. Yet, the power of Jesus’ name continues to reign supreme, as it has, since the day of Pentecost almost two-thousand years ago. However, the most alarming aspect of this is that our Lord’s name seems to flow out of the mouths of non-Christians much more consistently than of those who profess belief in Christ. That is a pretty sweeping generalization, so, allow me to explain what I mean.

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Category: Misc.
Posted by: RBAFounderX


W.Va. Woman Speaks About Torture Ordeal
By Shaya Tayefe Mohajer


The Associated Press:
Megan Williams thought she was going to a party. That's why she tagged along with a woman she hardly knew, up a remote southern West Virginia hollow to a run-down trailer surrounded by beer cans and broken-down furniture.

"But there wasn't no party," Williams said. "I realized I'd made a bad mistake."

For at least a week, authorities say, the 20-year-old black woman was kept captive in a shed, tortured, beaten, forced to eat rat, dog and human feces, and raped by six white men and women who taunted her with racial slurs.

"They just kept saying 'This is what we do to niggers down here,'" Williams told The Associated Press in one of her most extensive interviews since the shocking case made national headlines last month.

Seated in a rocking chair in her mother's living room, about 50 miles from that shed, the slight woman with cocoa-colored skin says she was hopelessly outnumbered by people who just wanted to hurt a black person.

...But when Williams does detail her alleged torture, it comes in fits. Horrifying, disjointed memories of all that she allegedly endured spill forth while she fidgets and frowns.

"They braided some switches together and beat me across the back," she said.

"They tore my clothes off of me and everything, and then they took me up to the lake and they said that was the place they were going to cut my throat and throw me in," she said.

Williams looks off into the distance at the end of each recollection. She often falls quiet, reverting to yes and no answers, each response softly punctuated with "ma'am."
To read the rest of the article, click here
Category: Misc.
Posted by: RBAFounderX
Yahoo!7 News:
"I am the black sheep elected after being chased," declared the first black politician to be voted in to the Swiss parliament in the first interviews following the elections.

Ricardo Lumengo, who arrived in Switzerland 25 years ago from Angola, was savouring a victory that surprised him more than anyone else.

It was a victory made all the sweeter in the context of an election campaign fought on the anti-immigration, anti-crime views held by the right.

The highly controversial poster from the Swiss People's Party showing a black sheep being kicked out of Switzerland by three white sheep gained them headlines at home, loathing in the foreign press and a substantial increase in votes and seats at home.
To read the rest of the article, click here

Category: General
Posted by: RBAFounderMM
Howard University shirt

When certain obligations in DC arise, if possible, I try to take the Washington, DC Metro subway. Hence I find myself on the subway regularly. Riding the metro automatically puts me in close quarters with unbelievers and therefore I have found that this is one of the best ways to meet and form relationships with unbelievers.

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Category: Social
Posted by: RBAFounderX
Once again, Prof. Anthony Bradley over at WorldMag has asked some important questions regarding evangelicalism and race consciousness, especially in light of tons of noose appearances.

He says:
Nooses in Jena, Louisiana, nooses at Columbia University in New York City, and their lingering ancillary protests, reveal that America has yet to recover from centuries of racial tension. Even worse is the fact that American Christianity has little credibility in pointing to the church as a model of social progress in the area of race.

In 1958 Martin Luther King once said, “Unfortunately, most of the major denominations still practice segregation in local churches, hospitals, schools, and other church institutions. It is appalling that the most segregated hour of Christian America is eleven o’clock on Sunday morning.” Is this still true today?

Brutal honesty confesses that not much has changed in evangelicalism since 1958. Sunday morning is segregated, yes, but so is every other day in the lives of most Christians. At 6:00 pm we retreat back to our racially homogenous marriages, families, neighborhoods, and the like, only to reintegrate for work, entertainment, or commerce. Our Sunday associations represent nothing less than those relationships we choose to enjoy throughout the week.

America confuses institutional diversity with relational diversity. The races tolerate each other at work or school because our private lives are designed for affinity associations, “people like me.” Many Christian parents say, “We’re not racist” until their blonde-haired, blue-eyed daughter starts dating a man of Mexican descent, or even worse for some, a black family discovers that their Ivy-league son is courting a white female classmate.

Good complaints are made about Jesse Jackson and Al Sharpton but where are the evangelical leaders, of all races, publicly demanding airtime and offering an alternative vision when conflict arises? We should have no expectations that American culture will advance in her race consciousness until the church embodies the implications of our common anthropology expressed in the Gospel lived out in local community life.
Category: Misc.
Posted by: RBAFounderX
These are some sangin' Black folks!

Category: Social
Posted by: RBAFounderX
Noose

In the last few weeks, there has been a serious outbreak of noose incidents all over the country. Just last week, a noose was placed on the Black professor’s door at Columbia University. Previously, “In July, a noose was left in the bag of a black Coast Guard cadet aboard a cutter. A noose was found in August on the office floor of a white officer who had been conducting race-relations training in response to the incident. In early September, a noose was discovered at the University of Maryland in a tree near a building that houses several black campus groups. On Sept. 29, a noose appeared in the locker room of the Hempstead, N.Y., police department, which recently touted its efforts to recruit minorities. On Oct. 2, a noose was seen hanging on a utility pole at the Anniston Army Depot in Alabama” (Source). If anyone believes the Jena 6 case/story is blown out of proportion, I think these recent noose sightings serve to demonstrate that, although, we are in a post-civil rights era, we are no where near beyond white supremacist ideologies and acts.

I want to begin by re-examining the all too familiar Jena 6 story. I believe if we truly understand what happened in Jena, this will allow us to put these other recent noose sightings in proper perspective and discover their meaning, even for us.

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Posted on: 10/16/07:

Do Missing Black Women Matter?

Category: Misc.
Posted by: RBAFounderX


Do Missing Black Women Matter?
By Kevin Eason

When it comes to missing persons, the media has been consistent on two points. One, if the missing person is female, white and attractive by media standards, that case is going to get plenty of attention. There will be interviews with the victim’s family, friends, teachers, pastor, and family pet.

There will be pictures in newspapers both national and local. Film of the victim will be on as many newscasts as possible. And fliers will be everywhere.

Two, if the missing person is black, Hispanic, (male or female), the reverse is true. There will be an initial flurry of media attention but it will quickly die. If the family of the victim does not have resources and determination, the story of their loved one will quickly move from the front page to no page.

Right now, according to the FBI, there are 47,600 active adult cases of missing persons. Of those 29.1 percent are black and about 22,200 are women. You would never know that from reading the newspapers or watching the news.

We rarely hear about the cases of Tamika Huston or Stepha Henry on national news programs. They spend their time and resources telling us about runaway brides or celebrity drunk drivers. Or sending reporters to Aruba to find the reasons for the disappearance of a young, white woman.

Don’t misunderstand. The cases of missing white, blond, young women should not be minimalized. The heartache and grief their families feel is as real as the pain of any family of color.

But neither should the cases of missing women and men of color be ignored or minimalized. No doubt one reason for the lack of coverage in these cases is because our women are expected to be victims of crime. The media expects our women to be mistreated, exploited and harmed.

That kind of thinking means that if anything happens to someone you expect to be a crime victim, it has no newsworthiness. - Rasheed Baith (Source)



See also from CBS News: Not All Missing Persons Are Equal

Category: Misc.
Posted by: RBAFounderX
LATINOS/HISPANICS...WHAT NEXT!
Some reflections on the politics of identity in the U.S.
by Martha E. Gimenez

I have always written for academic journals, and it is for me a pleasure to be able to express my ideas freely, without worrying about footnotes and ritualistic "reviews of the literature." While these views have been published elsewhere (see bibliography), they remain hidden from most of those who might find them personally and politically relevant. This is why I welcome the chance to contribute to this special issue of HERESIES, for they will now reach many whose lives have been directly affected by the "Latino" and "Hispanic" labels, as well as many others whose politics have made them aware of the pitfalls inherent in identity politics at this time.

I became interested in these issues when I found out, some years ago, that I was included among the "minority faculty" in the university where I work. As I am a foreigner (I was born and grew up in Argentina and came to this country as an adult), I thought, naively, that the affirmative action office might have made a mistake. They informed me, orally as well as in writing, that I was a "Hispanic" and, therefore, they had the right to count me as a "minority." This was indeed a surreal and upsetting experience first because of the racism entailed in the denial of my identity and the imposition of a spurious "hispanicity" loaded with negative connotations, and also because of the administrative uses to which I was subject by becoming part of the statistics used to show compliance with the law. It was also absurd and even funny in a weird sort of way because, for anyone like myself, aware of the heterogeneity of the populations thrown together under the label,the idea is nonsensical, to say the least.

But this is no laughing matter, for labels have consequences and these became increasingly clear to me as I began to search for critiques of the "Hispanic" label . I thought I would find plenty, for I mistakenly considered that the problems inherent in the label were obvious, but I was wrong: I found only a handful of articles which, critical of the "Hispanic" label, suggested that "Latino" was more historically and politically adequate. Upon reflection, I concluded that neither label was acceptable for reasons I will outline as follows:

These labels are intended to identify a "minority group" -- i.e., a group which the "majority" considers inferior, which has been historically oppressed for generations, and which, objectively, is socially rejected, economically excluded, and lacks political power. The invention of the "Hispanic" label erases the difference between the historically oppressed populations of Mexican and Puerto Rican origin and newly arrived immigrants from Central and South America. Moreover, it does not differentiate between those populations and people from Spain. Altogether this blurring of distinctions has many negative implications for members of local minorities, for arriving immigrants, and for the average American, whose relative ignorance about the world beyond U.S. boundaries is strengthened by labels that stereotype practically the entire world. The bombardment of the population with statistics that constantly stress the differences among whites, Asians,Blacks, and "Hispanics" as well as ethnic/racial politics and practices that minoritize everyone who is not from Europe must contribute to the strengthening of racial stereotypes and an oversimplified view of the world, especially among the very young, the uneducated and the prejudiced, for whom the world might easily now appear to be populated
primarily by minorities.
To read the rest of the article, click here
Category: General
Posted by: RBAFounderMM
Harlem streets

When my family and I moved to Temple Hills, Maryland (5 minutes from the SE Washington, DC line) from Orlando roughly 3 months ago, we were bubbling with excitement. God has guided and continues to garner within our minds and hearts a resolute belief that He will influence and change a community through us and the church of which we are a part. We have found confirmation of God’s will here in Temple Hills. Our joys and hopes are fulfilled each day as we see the hearts and lives of the people of this community slowly changed and transformed to meet His blessed will and desires. But amid the joys of the promises of transformation and newness, and oh how we wait so eagerly and yet willingly each day as the fruit slowly grows, we are met with and have been made continually aware of the loss, pain and sin this community faces each day.

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Posted on: 10/06/07:

Video of the Day: Savion Glover

Category: Misc.
Posted by: RBAFounderX
Sheer genius!

Category: General
Posted by: LeeRichardson


As a spin off to the article written by Xavier on the necessity of integrating blackness and reformedness, I saw it as only fitting to include my experience with Reformed theology in HHH (holy hip hop). I would suggest you read over X's article to become familiar with this conversation, as I do not desire to re-invent the wheel.

While leaving out of a traditional Black Charismatic church, in search of a local congregation that held to (at least) the 5-Points, I became (perhaps) over-zealous with sharing Calvinism... and later Reformed / Covenantal theology with all my friends and family who were still in a church with faulty doctrine. It became my mission to "win" them over to the TRUTH of the word of God.

» Read More

Category: General
Posted by: RBAFounderX
Supreme Court Clarence Thomas Interview

This was a fascinating and insightful interview with Justice Thomas. There is no doubt that he has a great mind no matter what your thoughts of him. I would highly recommend watching the video because the transcript below does not do the interview justice (no pun intended).

Quick aside: When talking about the company of his Yale Law School days, it was stated first by Kroft, " 'Bill and Hillary Clinton were also there at the time. 'Yeah, but they weren't president,' Thomas says, laughing. 'Maybe they were running for president, but they weren't president then.' " Does Justice Thomas know something we don't because Hillary was never the President of the United States? So what does "they" mean? Was that a sign of prophetic speech or inside knowledge (oops)? I guess we'll see.

Video 1 of 3:


Video 2 of 3:


Video 3 of 3:


From CBS:
Most Americans know very little about the workings of the U.S. Supreme Court or its members, but mention Justice Clarence Thomas, and you are likely to start an argument.

He is the court's only African American, and it's most conservative member. He is arguably the most influential black man in the country, yet he is reviled by many in his own race for his opposition to government programs intended to help minorities.

Most people know very little about him, their opinions shaped by his bitter confirmation battle in which he was accused of sexually harassing a former employee named Anita Hill. Now, 16 years later, he has written a memoir called "My Grandfather's Son," which lays bare a remarkable life and the events that shaped it.

Supreme Court justices are private people who rarely give interviews and Justice Thomas doesn't think much of the press, but he gave correspondent Steve Kroft and 60 Minutes seven days of his life to talk about all of it.

» Read More

Category: General
Posted by: RBAFounderX
Lionel Woods has started a much needed conversation (with helpful comments too) on his blog about Christian (parental) responsibility and response to using contraceptives if teens, etc. are sexually active. I remember talking to a pastor last year about sexual promiscuity and STDs, even in the church and he said, “It would be unethical to not talk about the use of contraceptives with our [sexually active] youth!”