Archives

You are currently viewing archive for June 2007
Category: Misc.
Posted by: RBAFounderMM

Category: General
Posted by: RBAFounderMM
Why Should White Guys Have All the Fun

Some may remember the book published some years ago by the same title. It is the story of late author Reginald Lewis, who grew up in a Black family in segregated Baltimore. He attended parochial school, worked his way through college and Harvard Law and became a successful attorney and highly visible business executive, capping his career with the leveraged buyout of conglomerate Beatrice International Foods for $985 billion in 1987. His personal fortune was $400 million. The book is not only an inspiring bio/business study but deftly conveys Lewis's concerns not only about his work but also about his family, race and his own death. Even though my piece veers from the nature and theoretical philosophy behind his work, there is an interesting transcendent ideology which he recognizes. But how can Lewis’ basic assertions provided first and strongly by his title and mine, rationally be connected to the American theological realm and culture and not only be contained within the realm of wealth and economics? The rest of this work seeks to answer that very question.

» Read More

Category: General
Posted by: RBAFounderX
Because sometimes they don’t tell you it’s Irish, Scottish, German, English, or Dutch (theology).
Category: Church
Posted by: RBAFounderX
As a Black Christian brother, I have much respect for Quincy Jones aka Q. However, as it pertains to Q’s first and second critique, it is not at all clear that he has actually understood my fundamental position. And I do not say that lightly or uncharitably. While I would like to give a more extended rebuttal to Q’s criticisms, unfortunately, brother Q has barely interacted with the critical aspects of the arguments in my article, Expository Preach: An Apostolic and Black Re-Evaluation. With such a lack of serious and careful engagement with my argumentation, I am not in much of a position to give a longer and more helpful rebuttal that is beyond just a shouting match. Nevertheless, I will try to undertake some of Q’s basic concerns and problem areas, which could hopefully deepen our discussion on some level.

» Read More

Category: Misc.
Posted by: RBAFounderX
Poverty, Strife Stanch Nigeria's Oil
By Edward Harris

Protests against oil companies began here in Ogoniland, 500 square miles of oil-rich land. When villagers drove out the oil companies, that brought relative peace - but not prosperity - because there are no oil company payments to fight over. Similarly, the democratic experiment that has emboldened militants elsewhere in southern Nigeria has brought new liberties, but no framework for the peaceful resolution of grievances.

The end of military rule in Nigeria was meant to be a start. Civilian rulers took over from the military in 1999, and that trend was apparently cemented when deeply flawed elections set up the first civilian-to-civilian handover since independence from Britain in 1960.

"At least we have our freedom," said Kelvin Agbam, a community development leader in the Niger Delta. "But that means freedom for everyone - even the militants."

When oil began flowing from Nigeria in 1958, the country had a growing industrial base, vast farms and some of the best universities in Africa.

Now, after disastrously corrupt military and civilian regimes, Nigeria has seen its bounties squandered. Most of its 140 million people have grown poorer. Few Nigerians enjoy electricity or running water.

Nowhere is the decay more pitifully on display than in the Niger Delta, where the crude is located. Hundreds of billions of dollars worth of oil have been drilled, but few villages have basic schools or health clinics.
To read the rest of the article, click here
Posted on: 06/15/07:

Happy Father's Day!

Category: Misc.
Posted by: RBAFounderX
“Dance With My Father” by Luther Vandross

Category: Misc.
Posted by: RBAFounderX
Hey America, meet F1's newest star
By Mike Harris, AP Auto Racing Writer

Meet Lewis Hamilton, the newest racing star in the Formula One Firmament. Very new. Fans around the world already know his name and his face, thanks to the global popularity of F1 and its international television coverage. But the first black man to race in the 61-year history of F1 is a stranger to most Americans.

That's not surprising, since the man on the street in the United States would be hard-pressed to name even one current F1 driver, especially now that seven-time champion Michael Schumacher has retired.

F1 insiders are hoping that will change this week at the U.S. Grand Prix in Indianapolis, where the 22-year-old Hamilton will make his U.S. debut.

"I don't know if he will make any new Formula One fans in the States," said three-time world champion Jackie Stewart. "But this kid is the best young talent to come along in F1 in many years. I hope people watch."

Hamilton, who comes from Stevenage, England, has burst onto the F1 scene unlike any rookie before him.

In his first six starts, the Mercedes McLaren driver has finished in the top three every time, culminating with a win from the pole Sunday in the Canadian Grand Prix in Montreal. And the victory appeared to be no fluke as Hamilton led all but three of the 70 laps and was never really challenged.

Now he heads for the historic Indianapolis Motor Speedway leading teammate and two-time F1 champion Fernando Alonso by eight points at the top of the standings.
To read the rest of the article, click here
Category: Church
Posted by: RBAFounderX
Black Preacher

Expository preaching is arguably one of the main hallmarks of reformed public worship. In almost every reformed book on ecclesiology and public worship there is a chapter or section on expository preaching. Most reformed folks would contend if the sermon were not preached expositionally, then it was not “true to the text” or much of a “biblical” sermon. And the same is just as true in many Black Reformed circles. Some Black Reformed folks think this is exactly what’s missing in many Black churches in order for these churches to get back on the supposed right path to become a healthier church.

However, if the truth be told, many people (Black, White, etc.) who preach expositionally, don’t really preach expositionally anyway. Just because you walk through a set of verses and/or book of the Bible each week consecutively does not necessarily mean that you are preaching expositionally in the way most people (and textbooks) define expository preaching. I don’t ever recall a time when I’ve seen an expositional sermon on the same text by two different people “expositing” the text the same way or saying the same thing. The underlying logic for this occurrence is that everyone is different. My response, assuming the hidden logic of expository preaching is true: shouldn’t our expository preaching all be saying the same thing, if we are all working our way through the same text verse-by-verse? The fact of the matter is that expository preaching is relative, especially to the preacher’s context/audience. We all know this. Reformed preachers disagree with one another all the time over what constitutes an expositional sermon. So why in the world do Reformed people, especially some Black Reformed folks put such a premium on expository preaching as if this is the only “biblical” way to preach, even though, it has no command/sanction in the Scripture itself?

» Read More

Posted on: 06/02/07:

Free two-year state colleges

Category: Misc.
Posted by: RBAFounderX
Patrick seeks free two-year state colleges
Goal is key in 'cradle to career' plan

By Maria Sacchetti, Globe Staff

Governor Deval Patrick plans to unveil a proposal today to make Massachusetts' community colleges, among the priciest in the nation, free to all high school graduates in the state by the year 2015, according to documents obtained by the Globe.

The proposal is the centerpiece of Patrick's vision for a "cradle to career" education system that would dramatically expand the concept of public education in Massachusetts.

The plan, which he will outline during commencement at the University of Massachusetts at Boston, would also provide preschool for all children, extend the school day and year, and guarantee two years of community college paid for by the state.

But Patrick's ambitious plan includes neither price tags nor funding proposals as the state struggles financially. Instead, it calls for a commission that would be charged with transforming the plan into reality.

"We must create an integrated, comprehensive educational system that nurtures and develops students through each critical phase of development," says an outline of the plan obtained by the Globe. "In today's economy, a high school diploma is not enough."
To read the rest of the article, click here
Posted on: 06/01/07:

The Problem of Evil

Category: Theology
Posted by: minruth
Evil

The problem of evil can be defined as the difficulty a theist has with a non-theist advance on the basic justice of God in the face of evil. The standard Christian response is an inefficient explanation, either that one can not know these things (even Boettner backs off of his previously strong language concerning God’s sovereignty, admitting “it is not ours to explain how God in His secret counsel rules and overrules the sinful acts of men…”), or that the evil somehow doesn’t really exist ontologically, or that its existence is necessary for the existence of good in all its complexity or finally, that God, while good, is impotent. Various Christian theodicy’s have been put forth to vindicate God’s basic goodness in the face of evil. Not only do these arguments not answer the problem of natural evil, but applied to the Judeo-Christian tradition they ignore the Biblical assertions about God’s sovereignty. I intend to argue however, that there is an epistemological problem with the classical query into the so-called problem of evil; second, I intend to argue that the free will arguments are not sufficient to answer the query--ultimately showing that God can be both all-good and all-powerful in a world in which evil exists--being fully aware that such an assertion is a source of perplexity.

» Read More